Posts in Category: Zika

Zika Virus Takes Dangerous Turn

In recent years, the Zika virus was found only in Africa and parts of Asia. The illness, which is predominately spread by tropical native mosquitos, was previously known to cause mild fevers and chills, muscle and joint soreness or stiffness, and mild to severe rashes in infected people. However, Dr. Sergio Cortes’ recent article about the epidemic outbreak of the Zika virus, which was published on his official website, revealed that the once mild virus has taken a dangerous turn and become a serious disease. The CDC has recently called the outbreak of the virus an epidemic and advised travelers to use extreme caution when traveling to countries who are experiencing an outbreak of the virus.

The CDC and the World Health Organization began to consider the outbreak of the Zika virus a serious disease when they noticed correlation between people who were infected with the disease and the development of serious neurological diseases in infants born to infected mothers. After a series of tests that were conducted on individuals who were infected with the virus, a definitive link was found to the neurological conditions. Additionally, it was discovered that while the virus initially produced no symptoms in about 8 out of 10 infected people, it was now producing several symptoms in about 9 of 10 infected people. So, not only had the disease developed into a more serious condition, but it was now adversely affecting a people at a higher rate than usual.

According to Dr. Sergio Cortes, medical officials still aren’t completely sure about what caused the virus to develop into a more sophisticated disease over the course of such a small amount of time. Up until a year ago, the disease was localized to Africa and Asia and did not show signs of sophistication. In fact, the virus was little more than a nuisance to the people it infected until recent years. Dr. Sergio Cortes explained that the rush to develop a vaccine or antivirus drug is now occurring in Brazil and other affected countries due to the now serious nature of the disease. During the previous 60 to 70 year period that the disease has been in existence, officials have not had an urgent reason to develop a vaccine for such a small virus. Developing a vaccine for the Zika virus in previous years would be equivalent to developing a vaccine to an allergic reaction to a mosquito bite. In any case, the disease has progressed and taken a turn for the worse. Medical professionals are currently in the process of developing a vaccine for the disease, but are not optimistic that a vaccine will be produced and approved within the year. Officials estimate that it will take at least three years to release a Zika virus vaccine.